How to Macrame

by Macrame

How to macrame is what this blog is all about. If you are a beginner with macrame, this step by step macrame instruction will get you going. First, some basics for the beginner. Macrame is about tying knots. there are many different knots you can use in macrame, but there are a certain few that you will use most often such as the square knot. Learning these basic macrame knots is all you really need to get started.

Macrame is a craft by which many items may be created using simple knots. This goes far beyond the original concept which included projects such as plant hangers and owls.  These days, macrame is being used to create purses, dresses, shorts, wall hangings, bracelets, earrings, hammocks, chairs and all sorts of wonderful things. The only limit is of course, your imagination.  We will begin with an explanation of the supplies we will use and where they can be purchased.

There are several types of cord used in macrame. Natural cords include jute and hemp. There is a natural beauty to these cords, and they are perfect for beginners. My preference is to use only synthetic cord, which are made of herculon fiber. These cords are washable, and can also be brushed and heat fused. They are also fade proof. This is an important consideration for outdoor plant hangers or wall hangings that receive a lot of light.

Cords are available in varying thickness ranging from .5 to 8mm basically, the larger the number the thicker the cord so 8mm is the thickest. You will also be using metal rings and beads once you learn the basic knots. The easiest way to work a project is on a flat macrame board. The project is held in place using t-pins, which help with the spacing of knots in the patterns. If you don’t have a macrame board yet, a clip board will do just fine.

Acajou Crafts is one of my favorite places for macrame supplies. They carry a good selection of rings, project boards, cord, beads and also project kits, which are perfect for beginners. They carry synthetic cord in 2mm, 4mm, and 6mm which are common thicknesses for many projects. With free shipping on many items, you can’t go wrong!

 

 

First, let’s start with some basic supplies:

  • macrame cord (hemp or  jute is great for beginners, twine will work too)
  • a ring or dowel (this is what you will anchor the cords to while you tie knots. Even a wooden spoon will work just fine to start with)
  • scissors to cut the cord
  • Mounting board or clip board, to secure the cords while you are knotting

Basic Macrame Terms to Start:

  • Knotting Cords-these are the cords on the outside that you are knotting with, while the filler cords are the middle cords.
  • Filler Cords-these are the cords in the middle, or inside that stay put.

For the rest of the month, we will feature one post a day dedicated to macrame instructions. You will learn all the basic macrame knots, important macrame instructions and tips and tricks. This series is aimed at anyone who has been looking to learn how to macrame. Follow these daily step by step macrame instructions and you’ll be making macrame in no time at all!

 

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

beadinggem May 13, 2011 at 12:56 pm

Thanks for dropping by my blog and for recommending your great resource! Pearl

Reply

Macrame May 24, 2011 at 3:01 pm

You are welcome Pearl, you have a great site!

Reply

Milana July 8, 2011 at 7:52 pm

I came across this blog and just wanted to say “how cute!” It was really eye-catching. I have a question, I bought a macrame belt from a mail order catalog. It came in large and x-large, I chanced it and got the large. It’s way too long. I know what will happen if I cut it, but how can I sh0rten it without reworking the knots ? Can you suggest an easier way for me to do this? Thanks! milana

Reply

gardenslp July 9, 2011 at 12:57 pm

Hello,
After losing some plants to the wind and flimsy plastic hanging pots, I decided to buy some
macrame plant hangers. Of course, because this year I decided to buy them, I can’t find macrame plant hangers in any of the stores where I live. I’d like to try making some.
How do you determine how big to make a plant hanger based on pot size?
Thanks!

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: